Bullet Journalling, setting priorities, time management

Prioritizing You.

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In my last post, I answered what I considered to be the Top 10 myths and questions regarding bullet journaling, as evidenced by the numerous posts on the topics across various social media groups.  I did, however, leave out what is perhaps the biggest statement that we see several times a day, and that is:  I want to start bullet journaling but I don’t have the time.  On a similar note, it’s not uncommon to see someone post something like, I just don’t have the time to keep up with my bullet journaling!

Invariably, this all comes down to how we prioritize our time and what we expect from a bullet journal.  So let’s begin with our expectations of a bullet journal.  In it’s purest form, Ryder Carroll developed the system to be a time *saver*.  Rapid logging and migration was never meant to take hours.  Rather, it was meant to be exactly as it’s name implies:  Rapid.  Of course, as we all know, that system gained traction and speed and grew into something Ryder certainly never expected, which is a nearly cult-like movement in journaling.  With it’s growth came change, and the system quickly evolved into artistic and instagrammable planning loosely based on rapid logging.

It seems, however, that this evolution is creating more stress for many, stress which the system was designed to alleviate.  So when you find yourself overwhelmed and out of time for your bullet journal, try asking yourself why you’re really using it.  Are you using it to be part of that movement?  As an art journal?  As social media fodder to promote your pages? Or are you using it as it was intended – to help you better manage and organize your time?

From my personal perspective, it *can* be time consuming.  The longer I use this system, Continue reading “Prioritizing You.”